GOOD


Can a giant mirrored sculpture draw attention to one of the most important, and under-recognized, documents ever written? A pop-up art installation created by GOOD and Human Rights Watch is seeking to do just that.

The creation, titled #HumanFamily, celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), a landmark document declaring fundamental rights for all of humanity.

The installation is inspired by the opening words of the 1948 document which reads, "Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world..."

The art, which is designed to inspire curiosity and engagement with the UDHR, includes an eight-foot-tall mirrored lenticular that reads, "MEMBER OF THE HUMAN FAMILY." Other messages become visible when the object is viewed from different perspectives. On the back is a mirror highlighting the 30 individual articles of the UDHR.

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Communities

Human Rights Watch Wants to Stop Killer Robots

If it’s not already too late...

Photo by Flickr user Global Panorama.

It’s probably already too late to stop the inevitable domination of the robot race—because, let’s be real, our iPhones are about iOS update away from becoming self-aware and subjugating all of humankind—but that won’t stop Human Rights Watch from trying. The human rights organization published a report called Mind the Gap on Thursday imploring the United Nations to adopt laws that would prohibit the development of “autonomous killer robots.” “Autonomous” is the key word here, because, as we all well know, killer robots already do exist, and they can fly, too—they’re called drones.

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Articles


It's not easy solving poverty, reducing global child mortality or achieving pretty much any of work international aid workers take on every day. Look at our lagging progress with the Millennium Development Goals for evidence of how much work lay ahead.

So what's to be done? Who's getting it right? Where's hope to be found?

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Articles