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Young Activists Care About Race, Gender, and the Economy—But Not the Election

A new report reveals Millennials want social change, but don't believe the election can make it happen.



A new report from the Applied Research Center concludes that young progressive activists care about racial justice, class divides, and gender issues. They're worried about widespread ignorance, complacency, and the danger of unchecked capitalism. They also don't have much faith in Obama—or much use for the upcoming election.

The report was compiled using information from several focus groups of progressive activists in Portland, Oakland, Atlanta, Baltimore, and New York. The ARC chose participants (about half of them white, half people of color) with "experience as a paid employee, volunteer, or small donor of a social justice or community organization," or who had participated in the Occupy movement.

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TED's Taboo: What's Too Controversial for the Hipster Confab?

Real talk about rich people is the last sacred cow at conference where the entry fee starts at $7,500—and reaches heights of $125,000.


Visit the website for TED, the conference for creative techies and do-gooding hipsters that vaulted the 18-minute lecture into an art form, and you’ll find speakers discussing everything from “Sculpting Waves in Wood and Time” to “Building U.S.-China relations … by Banjo.”

What you won’t find is a recent TED talk by Michael Hanauer, a wealthy venture capitalist, that argues income inequality is a problem that threatens the economy, and that higher taxes on the wealthy are part of the solution.

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Moving On Up to the Northeast Side: Where Can You Climb the Income Ladder?

It’s time to ask yourself if your career’s in the right place—not figuratively, but physically.


If you aim to climb the income ladder in the United States, your best bet might be to move north and east—and definitely stay out of the south.

A new study from the Pew Charitable Trusts Economic Mobility Project—check out the group's nice interactive map—compares the ability of people to increase their average earnings over time in all 50 states and regions across the country.

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The 1 Percent Has Nearly Tripled Its Share of America's Income

An alarming new Congressional Budget Office study adds fuel to Occupy Wall Street's raging fire.

For more than a month now, Occupy Wall Street supporters have been camping in lower Manhattan to voice their dissatisfaction with, among other things, America's mind-boggling income inequality. Though they've faced criticism from naysayers all along the way, it turns out that the protesters' grievances aren't just figments of their collective imagination after all: In the past three decades, the richest 1 percent of Americans have seen their share of the U.S. income grow by 275 percent since 1979, according to a new study from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. In comparison, the poorest 20 percent had only an 18 percent increase. Never again should anyone ever ask, "What is Occupy Wall Street so angry about?"

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