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Indiana Governor Doesn’t Get Why People are Angry Over Anti-Gay Law (UPDATED)

He says that he would have “vetoed it” if he thought it was discriminatory.

Illustration of Mike Pence by Flickr user DonkeyHotey.

The governor of Indiana is confused as to why people are so mad after he signed a law that basically codifies discrimination against gay people. Speaking to the Indianapolis Star, Gov. Mike Pence expressed bewilderment that the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which would essentially allow businesses to discriminate against LGBTQ customers based on their sexual or gender identity, has raised such a fuss amongst god-fearing Americans, who are now championing campaigns to #boycottIndiana over the legislation. Gov. Pence says that had he thought it could be used to discriminate against specific groups of people, he would have “vetoed it”.

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Common Law: The Recession Is Forcing Law Schools to Be More Practical

Forget lectures and Socratic-style seminars. Law schools are shifting toward job-friendly skills like project management.



Can making law school more practical help grads facing a tough legal job market? That's the thinking behind recent changes in course offerings and faculty at the nation's law schools. Instead of continuing the tradition of theory-based courses in which students learn how to analyze a case, research the law, and make an argument, schools are shifting to teaching job-friendly skills like networking, managing clients, and how to file a case in court.

According to the Wall Street Journal, this shift is entirely driven by the recession. In 2010, only 25 percent of law school grads were hired by big law firms, down from 33 percent in 2009. Firms don't want to hire new grads because clients are "limiting the number of hours" a firm can charge and making policies "not to pay for first-year associates." That's because law schools traditionally equip students with theoretical knowledge, leaving them to pick up the practical aspects of being a lawyer on the job. However, clients no longer feel they should have to pay while someone gets up to speed, meaning that law firms are pushing back on law schools to send them grads that are ready to hit the ground running.

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