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Digitally Reconstructing the Mosul Museum Destroyed by ISIS Fighters

A team in Cyprus is crowdsourcing data on the lost items to build 3D models of the ruined artifacts.

A 3D reconstruction of The Lion of Mosul.

Researchers from the Cyprus University of Technology are hoping they can digitally reconstruct Iraq’s Mosul Museum, which was ransacked by fighters for Da’esh (more commonly known as ISIS). Spearheaded by volunteers from the Initial Training Network for Digital Cultural Heritage, Project Mosul will crowdsource photos, images, and data for the artifacts and objects that were destroyed and process it all to create three-dimensional models of what was lost.

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This week marks the 10th anniversary since the U.S. invaded Iraq. Over 4,000 American servicemembers died in that decade of conflict. A recent study said that, in total, the Iraq War may have cost 190,000 lives and $2.2 trillion dollars. Those numbers are difficult to swallow, much less comprehend.

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Ten Years After: How Not to Teach About the Iraq War

A decade after the U.S. invasion, social studies textbooks are so full of propaganda, they might as well have been written by the Pentagon.


In 2006, with U.S. troops occupying Iraq, the great historian and humanitarian Howard Zinn expressed his desire for the end of the war: "My hope is that the memory of death and disgrace will be so intense that the people of the United States will be able to listen to a message that the rest of the world, sobered by wars without end, can also understand: that war itself is the enemy of the human race."

At least in a formal sense, our country's memories of war are to be found in school history textbooks. Exactly a decade after the U.S. invasion, those texts are indeed sending "messages" to young people about the meaning of the U.S. war in Iraq. But they are not the messages of peace that Howard Zinn proposed. Not even close.

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The Top 10 Ways that Libya 2011 is Not Iraq 2003

Before you go comparing Libya to Iraq and Obama to Bush, you need to read this.


Here are the differences between George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the current United Nations action in Libya:

1. The action in Libya was authorized by the United Nations Security Council. That in Iraq was not. By the UN Charter, military action after 1945 should either come as self-defense or with UNSC authorization. Most countries in the world are signatories to the charter and bound by its provisions.

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