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Innovative Japanese Preschool is Built to Encourage Puddle-Jumping

Creative architecture helps create a space where children feel free to play, and learn, at the exact same time.

image via (cc) flickr user sixybeast

As a small child, I was absolutely petrified of thunderstorms. I can’t quite pinpoint what exactly caused my phobia, but whenever a bad storm would roll through town, the first rumble of thunder would send me scrambling under the bed, fingers stuffed firmly in my ears, to wait until things settled down. But as much as I may have been afraid of the thunder and lightning itself, I loved what usually came next. As a “reward” for making it through the storm, my parents would coax me out from my hiding spot, take me outside, and let me loose for a few glorious minutes of uninterrupted, adult-sanctioned, puddle jumping. For me, as scary as the storm may have been, running free to stomp, tromp, and splash my way from puddle to puddle was well worth the fright.

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International Students Share Their Favorite American Stereotypes

From food to fitness, people explain how they can tell someone’s from the United States.

Image via Youtube/Solfa.

For better or worse, stereotypes are one of the filters through which most of us see the world. They simplify our complex surroundings, and help our brains compartmentalize and process new information.

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Heroes: Teacher Saves 42 Students from Tsunami

Once the tsunami warnings sounded, Robert Bailey knew he only had eight minutes to save his student's lives.


Incredibly touching, heroic stories keep emerging from Japan's earthquake and tsunami disaster, and the latest comes from the coastal town of Ofunato. A courageous high school teacher named Robert Bailey saved the lives of his 42 students—and he only had eight minutes to do so.

The 27-year-old British national has lived in Ofunato for four years with his wife, Mai. In a twist of fate that may have saved his life, Bailey wasn't scheduled to be at school last Friday, but went in anyway on his day off to teach a fun cricket lesson. He told Sky News that when the earthquake struck, he and his students "first heard a weird cracking noise, then came the violent shaking."

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