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Want To Catch Orbiting Space-Junk? Give Space-Nets A Try

The European Space Agency announces 2021 plans to clear up Earth’s cluttered orbit using high-tech space-nets

"Netting a derelict satellite" image via ESA

Space, as it turns out, is not always the vast, expansive void we’re often lead to believe it is. Rather, space is full of junk–our junk, in fact–just floating around, and cluttering everything up. Dead satellites, spent booster rockets, and abandoned equipment encircle our planet by the thousands, slowly creating a tangled maze of metal through which their active-use, functional counterparts must navigate. As this image from NASA’s “Orbital Debris Program Office” shows, it’s a mess up there.

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TSA: Body Scans, Pat-Downs, and Junk-Inspired Acronyms

An enhanced look at TSA terminology—from enhanced pat-downs to porno-scanners to "don't touch my junk"—that are touching sensitive areas.

An enhanced look at TSA terminology—from pat-downs to porno-scanners to "don't touch my junk"—that are touching sensitive areas. \n

The airport has long been a source of frustration and humor, as you well know if you’ve ever missed a flight, endured a screaming baby, or watched Airplane (RIP, Leslie Nielsen). The annoyance and comedy rose to new levels in the past month, as the Transportation Security Administration unveiled the new “whole-body imagers,” along with the enhanced pat-downs that you’ve either experienced or (more likely) heard about by now. These aggressive gropings caused a national outcry that could be summarized by the words of Alias’s Sydney Bristow, who once responded to a full-scale frisk by pointing out, “It’s not a date!”

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The Senate just passed the Child Nutrition Act. This could be a turning point in the battle for healthy school meals, but will the industry back away quietly?

On Thursday, August 5th, the Senate unanimously passed the Child Nutrition Act, the federal legislation that stipulates the policy and funding for school meals. New policies include additional meal training and strengthened nutrition and fitness standards. To fund all of this, the bill allocates $4.5 billion, including an additional 6 cents per meal—the first non-inflationary revenue increase since 1973.

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