GOOD

A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Ten Commencement Speakers You Wish You'd Had

These ten speakers inspired but still kept it real with their audiences, making their graduation speeches memorable years after they were given.


Graduation is an exciting time, but let's face it: Commencement speeches aren't always memorable. A completely unscientific poll of the GOOD office revealed that almost none of us recall our college commencement speakers, or what they said to us (although we suspect it was something like, "You've worked hard! Yay!"). So here are 10 commencement speakers—and their inspiring, funny, and just plain on-point words of wisdom—that we wish we'd heard on graduation day.

1. Steve Jobs, Stanford University, 2005: Jobs hits all the right notes in this speech, in which he shares his own humble upbringings and reflects on his pancreatic cancer diagnosis. He told the crowd, "Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Do Rich White Kids Automatically Think They're Harvard Material?

According to counselors, low-income black students need to be talked up into applying to elite schools. Well-off white students need talking down.

High school guidance counselors and college admissions officers need to adjust their college counseling approach depending on a student's racial and socioeconomic differences. At least that's the thinking in a piece from the Chronicle of Higher Education, "Redefining Admissions 'Success' For Black Males," which spotlights some of the dialogue that took place Monday at the regional Potomac & Chesapeake Association for College Admission Counseling's annual conference. Counselors and college admissions staff are thinking through needed shifts in their approach to both underrepresented groups, like black males, and groups that historically have had more access to higher education, like wealthy white students.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles