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Coming Clean: Cycling's Watershed Moment

Lance Armstrong's admission last week that he cheated during his career is a watershed moment for cycling and creates an opportunity for real reform.


Lance Armstrong's admission last week that he cheated during his cycling career will have profound repercussions through the sport that goes far beyond doping. Armstrong painted a picture of a sporting hierarchy that supported a culture of doping, a clear indication of a lack of good governance.

This is a watershed moment for cycling and creates an opportunity for real reform. Although the Armstrong confession does not answer many of the key questions about how cycling is run, it shows the need for a transparent and inclusive reform process to help world cycling build a reputation for honesty and accountability.

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The GOOD Challenge: Give Up Processed Food for a Month

For our second GOOD Challenge, we're going to try giving up processed foods for a month. But what are "processed foods" anyway?

In January, my colleague Cord launched a year of GOOD Challenges with a pledge to give up soap and shampoo for a month. (He made it, and reported no ill-effects, although a weekend in Vegas toward the end of January definitely tested his resolve.) This month—which is the shortest of the year, thank goodness—it's my turn, and I'm giving up industrially processed food.

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Lance Armstrong's New Cancer Fight Goes Global

The cyclist is extending his battle with the disease to developing countries-and he wants you with him.

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When we think of what the developing world needs in terms of aid and health, cancer ranks low on most people's lists. But with cancer rates—and cancer deaths—skyrocketing in poor countries, shouldn't it be higher on our to-do list? Yes, says Lance.

When a parent is lost to cancer in the developing world, it often means no school for the kids, no food on the table, and a future in which the only certainty is poverty. In 2010, we'll lose 8 million people as this disease quietly becomes the world's leading cause of death for the first time ever. By 2030, that toll is projected to rise to 17 million in the developing world alone as populations increase. That’s roughly the equivalent of the entire populations of Los Angeles, Houston, and Chicago combined. A health crisis of epic proportions is descending upon the developing world—and not enough is being done to turn that tide.

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