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Wills from Famous Brits Now Available for Public Scrutiny, Thanks to U.K. Database

The wills of Princess Diana, Winston Churchill, and Charles Dickens are accessible to the public on a new government website.

Painting of Charles Dickens. Image via Wikimeda Commons.

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Will 2.0: A Last Testament for the Facebook Era

A new website let's you share your videos, images, and thoughts once you're gone.


As technology has rapidly advanced, it was only a matter of time that something as traditional as a last will would evolve as well. That's where PassedOn comes in. The web-based tool lets you create an "emotional will" using video, photos, text, and other media in order to be properly remembered. The idea is to share personal messages, confessions, memories, and other items with your friends, family, neighbors and coworkers for when you're no longer here.

To create an emotional will you simply upload media which can be updated regularly. Then you add people that you'd like to be contacted should you pass, along with three "guardians." The site will periodically check on you, and if they don't hear from you they will reach out to your guardians to see if you are still alive. If not, your will is released to your loved ones.

The idea of creating something for when I die, in just the way I would update my Facebook page, makes it all feel a little clinical. However, the idea seems to be catching on. The site launched in August of last year, and already has 75,000 members in 77 countries, all creating their own versions of how they'd like to be remembered.

What do you think, would you create a digital, emotional will?

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