GOOD

Meet the Punk Rockers Raising Learning Disability Awareness in This Year’s Eurovision Contest

Rockers Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät (“PKN”) are loud, fast, and in your face—all for a good cause.

image via (cc) flickr user pnuk

For most Americans, the annual Eurovision Song Contest is, at best, a moderately amusing blip on our typically domestically-focused radar. The contest—in which musical acts representing European countries (along with a few non-European ones) compete for personal fame and continent-wide glory—is something like a cross between the rah-rah nationalist fervor of the Olympics and the highbrow artistry of American Idol. Sure it’s entertaining, but the contest’s labyrinthine rules and complicated voting system make it a tough pill to swallow for those of us overseas. Occasionally a Eurovision winner does make it big enough to get noticed by American audiences (See: ABBA, Celine Dion, and GWAR-esque rockers Lordi) but more often than not they come and go without much ado outside their home country.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Some Disabilities Are Actually Quite Good For Society

It's time to shift our thinking about what constitutes a disability and what doesn't.


When my younger son was diagnosed with ADHD, the school psychologist ticked off a list of symptoms (hyperactivity, impulsivity, distractibility, etc.) and recommended medication. "Why," I asked, "Do you consider his learning issues a disability?" With an air of medical certainty, he responded that "these qualities are inappropriate for his age and will make it hard for him to function in a school setting."

But what if the disability in question actually has value to society? What if our economic well-being demands more people with that disability? It's time that we rethink our concept of disability.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Can Better Designed Classroom Furniture Help Students Who Can't Sit Still?

Dutch architecture firm i29's wire furniture designs might make it easier for students with ADD to concentrate.

Whether a classroom has student desks lined up in neat rows facing forward, or collaboration-friendly groups of desks or tables, one fact remains the same: Students are expected to sit still for the majority of the school day. For kids who are naturally fidgety, or have ADD or learning disabilities, that's a real challenge. But as Fast Company Design reports, a Dutch architecture firm, i29, thinks they've found a solution that will make it easier for kinetically-inclined students to concentrate.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles