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Vasectomies May Become Less Invasive, More Easily Reversible

The Parsemus Foundation has developed Vasalgel, an injectable nonhormonal gel polymer that effectively stops sperm from passing through the male vas deferens on a long-term basis.

"Sorry, sperm. Not in my house." Photo by Norma Gonzalez

Here’s another one for all you chomping at the bit for more riveting advances in the field of male contraceptive options: Vasalgel, a gel polymer that’s injected into the male vas deferens, creating a roadblock for sperm traveling through the channel—effectively a vasectomy, minus the slice n’ dice. Fluids can still pass through the barrier, but your swimmers will be stuck at the gate. The team behind Vasalgel at Parsemus Foundation, which focuses on innovative and neglected medical research, is touting it as a less invasive, more easily reversible vasectomy, as they offer a separate injection to dissolve the polymer barrier, thus allowing a man’s sperm to carry on as before.

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Finally, Male Birth Control Pills

Indonesian researchers have run successful clinical trials for male birth control pills utilizing a potent plant-derived chemical.

“Did you take your birth control pill?”

It’s a question that causes many women to bristle, a recurring reminder that the brunt of the responsibility falls on them to prevent pregnancy. It’s a lopsided arrangement, to be sure, but researchers in Indonesia are on a mission to level the field with birth control pills for men.

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Shilling The Male Pill: How To Sell Men Birth Control

Male birth control is a tough sell, which may be why it doesn't exist yet. We come up with a few ad campaigns to pique dudes' interest.


There's a joke in the medical community that no matter what year it is, an alternative male birth control method is always ten years away. And it’s true—doctors have been promising an option beyond condoms and vasectomies since the 1960s. Some scientists have taken a stab at it, most recently with the invention of RISUG, a one-time injection that is supposedly both side effect-free and reversible. Yet nothing ever seems to get approved and make it to market. What the hell is taking so long?

Men aren’t alone here. As we pointed out a few months ago, pharmaceutical companies aren’t exactly rushing to innovate new birth control for women, either. Part of the problem is biology; the human reproductive system is a complex thing. But when it comes to the possibility of a male pill, there’s also that pesky problem of marketing. What kind of dude is going to buy a birth-control drug meant to protect another person from pregnancy? There are financial and emotional concerns to having an unwanted child, but ultimately men are affected indirectly. It’s a tough sell.

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