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L.A. Student Does Graduate-Level Research on His High School, Finds It Lacking

"The majority of our computers at Crenshaw are still running Windows XP." A Crenshaw High student compares his school to one in Beverly Hills.

Do students in low-income neighborhoods understand the ways in which their schools are failing them? A group of teen researchers from some of the toughest high schools in Los Angeles do. As part of the UCLA-based Council of Youth Research, local students do graduate-level studies on their own schools and share their findings with their teachers and principals. This year the teens studied the availability of resources like books, computers, and counselors at their schools, and they're not happy about what they discovered.

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Teachers: Use Social Media for Educating Kids, Not Mocking Them

A Chicago teacher who made fun of one of her second-grade student's hairstyles online is just the latest example of social media misuse in schools.


Teachers, I know you get frustrated and have bad days, that's understandable, but the internet is not the place to vent about your students. No matter how private you think your Facebook page is, or how small your personal blog readership may be, what you've said will become a problem for you.

The latest example of online communication about students gone wrong comes from Chicago where a teacher at Overton Elementary on the city's South Side decided to mock one of her second grade student's hairstyles. Seven year-old Ukailya Lofton, who'd asked her mother to style her hair for picture day by tying Jolly Rancher candies to the ends of her braids, thought her teacher was being complimentary when she asked to take pictures of the hairdo.

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Los Angeles Unified Turns Watts High School Over to Charter Organizations

Jordan High School is set to be split into three campuses, and the school's 200 teachers will have to reapply for their jobs.

Los Angeles school officials have announced that for the second time in the district's history, they're handing off management of one of the city's lowest performing high schools to outside organizations. Watts' Jordan High School will be split into three campuses, and the school's 200 teachers will have to reapply for their jobs.

Two charter school operators, Green Dot Public Schools and Alliance For College Ready Public Schools will run two of the campuses, and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's nonprofit, Partnership for Los Angeles Schools will take over the third.

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