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Winners! Redesign the Food Label The Best Nutrition Label Ideas

Behold, four designs for a better food label. Who knows? You might actually read the label if they looked like this.

We're happy to announce the winners of our project to design a better nutrition label. It's about time. For years, the federal Nutrition Facts label—that mandated, black-and-white guide to the calories, fats, and sugars on the backs of all packaged foods—has gotten short shrift from shoppers. So with the help of our friends at the University of California at Berkeley's News21, we asked you to design a food label that consumers might actually want to read.

The Food and Drug Administration will begin work on some possible nutrition label revisions later this year. In the meantime, we recruited four experts to choose the best and brightest of the 60 impressive label designs you submitted. Our panel of judges chose four overall favorites that they thought really deserve our attention—and maybe even the attention of the federal overseers of nutritional labeling. Here they are:

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Redesigning the Nutrition Label: Here's One Scientist's Clever Proposal

Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest proposes a new nutrition label with a host of subtle but important changes.

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Some ADHD With those Froot Loops? Food Coloring Makes Kids More Hyperactive

The color of food signifies flavor and nutritional quality, but what if those colors are contributing to ADHD in hyperactive children?


In 1971, a 12-year old boy in Baltimore was admitted to the hospital after reportedly passing some loose stools that looked “like strawberry ice cream.” The young patient wasn’t suffering from abdominal cramping, but his doctors suspected he might have been suffering from internal bleeding, they wrote in a case study published in Pediatrics. After two days in the hospital, he was back to normal. At least he was back to normal until he started his old breakfast routine—a bowl of Franken Berry breakfast cereal. Then, it looked as if he were bleeding again.

No, this not an urban legend. But it's a case where artificial food coloring had unintended consequences. And something similar could be happening again—on a much larger scale, in ways that scientists are finding much less discernible.

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