GOOD

Watch Your Mouth: Eat Lightly and Carry a Big Fork How Big Forks and Heavy Bowls Help You Eat Less

Bigger forks and heavier bowls might sound supersized, but they could actually cut down on portion sizes.

Between the opening nights of All About Eve and Mean Girls, an average moviegoer’s portion of popcorn increased sevenfold. Starbucks' gut-busting Trenta is more than double the size of its original tall paper cup. The surface area of an average dinner plate is as much as 36 percent larger than it was in 1960. Even some recipes in the most recent edition of The Joy of Cooking, the staple of middle-class kitchens everywhere, expanded 42 percent from their 1931 versions.

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"Organic" Foods Pack on the Pounds

We often think organic means fewer calories, and that's why we should institute mandatory calorie counting.


Let's say you're at the mall, and someone offers you some food samples—cookies and potato chips. They're labeled “organic” or “non-organic.” Except this is really just an experiment and all the food is organic, but you don't know that yet and they're asking you what you think about "organic." If you're like most people, you tell them the "organic" food is healthier, tastes better, and has fewer calories.

Jenny Wan-chen Lee recently presented this study—coauthored by Brian Wansink, author of Mindless Eating and a professor at Cornell University—at Experimental Biology 2011.

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