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A new study suggests that students achieve more when their teacher is of the same race.

Representation in the classroom: The effect of own-race teachers on student achievement,” which will be published in the April issue of the Economics of Education Review, looked at both the races and test scores of almost three million students in Florida, as well as the racial demographics of their teachers in order to find the correlation between the two.

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Have 5 Minutes? Use it to Influence Federal Diversity Policy

Stakeholders like us have until December 24, 2013 to provide feedback and recommendations on how to make diversity regulations more effective.

Attention diversity nerds, Christmas came early this year! After three years of anticipation, six of the Offices of Minority and Women Inclusion finally released some proposed standards addressing how they're going to assess diversity policies of the banks and other financial businesses their agencies oversee in the private sector. This is a big deal, and we have an opportunity to make a big impact.

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What Can We Learn From Majority-Minority States? Numbers Don't Always Equal Political Power

Minority babies outnumbered white ones for the first time last year. But numbers don't always translate to political power.


Beginning at some point in the next 40 years or so, there will be no ethnic or racial majority in America, and according to the Census, that process already is well under way. For the first time, white births are outnumbered by minority births in the United States: From July 2010 to July 2011, whites accounted for 49.6 percent of all births while other racial groups combined made up 50.4 percent of the newborn population. In several states and 13 of the country's biggest cities, this has been the reality for decades.

One of the underlying fears propelling reactionary movements like the Tea Party is the loss of power. But how valid are these fears? Does a majority-minority country necessarily translate into more clout for previously marginalized groups? Not always, and certainly not right away. Women make up 51 percent of the population, yet they're underrepresented in leadership positions across the economic and political spectrum. Hawaii (which has never had a white majority), New Mexico, California, and Texas are majority-minority states, but the people who run them aren't exactly investing in the next generation by cutting funds to education and social services. (Indeed, some explicitly link this lack of resources directly to xenophobia.)

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