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Need to Boost Your Brainpower? Write–Don’t Type–This Down

Studies confirm what many have long suspected: When it comes to taking notes, handwriting matters.

image via (cc) flickr user chungholeung

When’s the last time you wrote something by hand? I mean really stopped, and took the time to put pen to paper, rather than simply type something out. Gone are the days when college lecture halls are filled with the sound of scratching notes being cranked out across reams of notebook paper. Instead, students increasingly take their notes amidst a cacophony of click-claking laptop keyboards, and the occasional, accidentally un-muted, *ding* of an incoming IM. But while technology has certainly made it easier to take more notes, more ways, in more places, that very same “more” is not necessarily better. In spite of the convenience typed notes may offer, research suggests that writing things down by hand may be significantly better for your brain.

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College Students Create Device that Helps Legally Blind Students Take Notes

Assistive technology brings classroom notes back to low-vision and legally blind students.

Remember the days of sitting in class, copying down what your teacher scribbled on the board? Now imagine the frustration you'd feel if you couldn't see that board. That's the situation San Diego State University student Jeremy Poincenot found himself in almost three years ago after contracting an extremely rare disorder called Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. As Poincenot shares in the above video, he'd lost his love for the college experience due to his inability to fully follow what was going on in class. That is, until he connected with Note-Taker, an assistive technology that helps "low-vision and legally blind students take notes in class as quickly and effectively as their fully-sighted peers."

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