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Shoe Made From Recycled Ocean Trash Pops Up in Time for Summer

Adidas teams up with Parley for the Oceans to create a new line made from colorful sea garbage.

As a rule I’m skeptical of big brands “going green,” but it seems adidas might just be on to something. Recently the sporty retail giant teamed up with Parley for the Oceans—an idealistic group of “creators, thinkers and leaders” attempting to re-purpose the ocean’s overwhelming amount of trash into reusable material—for a mystery project. Monday at the United Nations the brand unveiled their collaboration: the world's first ever shoe upper made solely from harvested ocean plastic and illegal deep-sea gillnets. The nets were retrieved after a 110-day expedition by Parley partner organization Sea Shepherd, where they tracked an illegal poaching vessel off the coast of West Africa.

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Meet The 20-Year-Old Who Plans to Cut Ocean Pollution in Half

Barely out of his teens, Dutch entrepreneur Boyan Slat thinks we should stop cleaning the ocean, and let it clean itself.

image via youtube screen capture

That our oceans are full of decades worth of pollution and garbage is an incontrovertible fact of science. The growing build-up of aquatic garbage—particularly plastics—threatens to permanently alter our waterways and wreak unimaginable havoc on the plants and animals that live there. Scientists from multiple disciplines agree our oceans are sorely in need of significant clean-up. What they don’t necessarily agree on is how to go about doing just that.

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Mermaids Are Awesome: Small Town Hairdresser's Alter Ego Fights for Clean Water

With her seashell bra and gold lame´ fin, Vira Burgerman crusades for a healthy coast. She's taking her message to the global mermaid community.

Vira Burgerman makes a living styling hair in a cute little town on the Russian River in Sonoma County, California, but she grew up working on commercial fishing boats in nearby Bodega Bay, and she's got an unusually strong connection to the sea. These days when she's not clipping and perming, this 46 year-old assumes an alter ego—the California Mermaid—and she dolphin kicks at the drop of a captain's cap for just about any watershed protection event, according to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat.

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