GOOD

Study Points to Multiple Causes of Bee Population Collapse

In a world of competing theories, sometimes more than one is right.

Photo by Charlesjsharp via Wikimedia Commons

Bees are disappearing all over the place. For years, scientists and apiarists have sought the cause of mass bee die-offs in the United States and Europe. And while many won’t miss the occasional uncomfortable sting from the little buzzers, they certainly will miss the $16 billion in American crops those bees pollinate every year. A number of supportable theories to explain the bee slump have been put forth—parasites, disease, loss of habitat to encroaching urbanization—but proving a single cause of the situation has remained elusive. Now, a new paper, published last month in Science, might tell us why.

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A Few Things to Remind People Quoting That Organic Food Study

Man, one document says organic food might not be worth the dollar and you'd think an organic vegetable had held up a bank.

Whoa, slow down, internet and television news! Man, one document says organic food might not be worth the dollar and you'd think an organic vegetable had held up a bank.

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Mapping Race, Gender, and Class in the Food Supply Chain

A new report details a shocking litany of injustices across the food chain, from pesticide poisonings to enormous wage gaps—and a silver lining.

On Wednesday, my colleague Cord posted the findings of a new report called "Behind the Kitchen Door," which detailed inequalities and abuses in the restaurant industry, including the fact that white restaurant workers make $4 an hour more than their minority counterparts.

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