GOOD

The Moms Aren't Wrong: Why Planning for Children Would Make Cities Better for All

Alexandra Lange explains why building New York around the unique needs of children would help all its residents lead happier, healthier lives.

When urban parents, particularly mothers, complain about the public realm they are often caricatured as whiny and overprotective. Your child was burned by the climbing domes at the new park? Kids are too coddled. You can’t carry your stroller and child down the subway steps? Make him walk. You can’t find a public bathroom? Stay at home. But what if the mothers, in many cases, are right? Access to safe, green open space, to accessible transportation, to clean bathrooms and places to rest are not solely the needs of children. What if catering to our youngest citizens, rather than dismissing them, would help us all live happier, healthier urban lives.

Keep Reading
Articles

Designing Buildings That Battle Obesity

A new handbook produced by New York's design and construction department sets out guidelines for creating buildings that encourage activity.

We talk a lot about designing greener buildings, but how about designing healthier buildings? The NYC Department of Design and Construction has been hard at work establishing guidelines for the relationship between public health and public space. A new handbook they've published, Active Design Guidelines, is focused on not only the green-design principles outlined by LEED certification but also "active design," constructing areas that encourage things like physical activity and interactive play.

Keep Reading
Articles