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Lisbon’s Junk Gets a Second Life as Gorgeous 3D Animal Street Art

Artur “Bordalo II” upcycles old bumpers and steering wheels to make Portugal’s capital city even more magical.

Lisbon, one of Europe’s most underrated cities, has in recent years been the recipient of an influx of artists, many fleeing Berlin and Paris for cheaper rents. While the expat scene thrives, the global community seems to have overlooked the local talent, which also exists in spades. One of these homegrown creatives is artist Arturo “Bordalo II,” who uses materials like old tires, scrap metal, steering wheels, oil paint, and bumpers to form impressive, larger-than-life 3D murals on walls and back alleys throughout the city. The stars of these murals are almost always animals, and the art itself is a mix of Banksy and a more colorful Tim Burton. In Bordalo’s Lisbon, scissor-like beaks protrude from the sides of buildings and a wall becomes a crouching raccoon. Bordalo’s output has been prodigious over the last few months, and Beautiful/Decay was recently able to document them all in one place. Many more can also be seen on Facebook.

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Roving Gang of Grannies Tag Blighted Buildings With Amazing Graffiti

After learning the finer points of spray paint art, these grandmothers took to the streets to show off their newfound skills.

Say the word “Grandma,” and you’re probably not going to think street art. While traditions vary by culture, the art form hasn’t been historically embraced by the grandma community, but some artists want to change that. So Lata 65, a group of Portuguese artists, decided to organize a team of volunteers to teach senior citizen women how to make their own street art.

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500 Years Later, Portugal Offers Citizenship to Descendants of Expelled Jews

Portugal welcomes back the Sephardic Jews it drove out in 1492 as part of the Inquisition.

King Manuel I, responsible for expelling tens of thousands of Jews from Portugal. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

In 1492 King Manuel of Portugal, in an effort to forge stronger ties with Spain, drove out tens of thousands of Sephardic Jews, many of whom had settled there after being expelled from Spain during the Inquisition. Now, more than 500 years later, Portugal will grant citizenship to their ancestors. The Portuguese parliament is finally implementing a law it endorsed back in 2013 to give dual citizenship to anyone who can prove descendence from the Sephardic Jewish victims of the Portuguese inquisition.

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