GOOD

Best Practice: Method Learns From a Sudsy Snafu

When you engage the public through the internet and in social media, it’s not just what your message says, but what it says about you.



Yep, this ad again.

Last week, we talked about how GOOD Company Finalist Method dealt with a public relations snafu: A viral video they created to promote more accurate labels on household labels created a backlash because of content—animated soap bubbles from a fake brand called Shiny Suds cat-calling a woman in the shower—that evoked sexual harassment. Like the ad’s critics, I found its humor pretty repellant, but there was definitely a contingent in the GOOD community who found the controversy overblown. Method’s leaders have found the incident a useful lesson in how to manage their relationship with their customers.

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Is College Worth the Money? Reflections from Six Graduates of the Class of 2011

Their answers about whether their degrees are worth it might just surprise you.

Students are racking up astronomical amounts of debt and moving home with mom and dad after graduation because there are no jobs to be found. PayPal founder Peter Thiel is even encouraging students to drop out and try entrepreneurship instead because, he says, college isn't worth it. So we decided to ask some graduates from the class of 2011 what they think. Almost all of them are worried about paying back their student loan debt, and of those not going on to grad school, none will have traditional full-time jobs. But their answers about the value of college might surprise you.

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Target Dumping Settlement: Did We Get Fooled by Clever PR?

Target was touting its buy-back program while quietly paying a $22.5 million settlement for illegal dumping of hazardous waste. Did we get fooled?


On Friday, we wrote about the efforts of retailers like Target and RadioShack to buy back used electronics with the help of sites like Gazelle and NextWorth. As we understood it, the program would allow people to make a little extra money off electronic inventory they didn't realize they own while also keeping e-waste out of landfills a little while longer. However, as commenter "JB" informed us, the story was published at the same time that Target was ordered to pay $22.5 million for illegal dumping of hazardous waste materials.

Violations included improper storage, transportation and disposal of bleach, paint, pesticides, batteries, lightbulbs and other hazardous materials. Prosecutors accused the retail giant of cutting corners for the bottom line. Chemicals returned by customers or found to be defective were poured down the drain, tossed into dumpsters and trucked to landfills not equipped for hazardous waste.

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