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Guess Which Wealthy Country Can't Guarantee Access to a Basic Human Need?

This week, Detroit's neediest had their water turned off. Here's what you can do about it.

Photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Detroit's Water and Sewerage Department has once again begun shutting off water services to some of their neediest citizens. Despite poor economic conditions, Detroit residents actually pay more for water than individuals in many other cities, as prices have shot up to cover the department’s waning revenues in the wake of dwindling populations and failing businesses. After a month-long moratorium, the shutoffs resumed yesterday, depriving human beings in the richest country in the world of the most basic necessity of human life.

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Free Flowing: How to Keep Our Water Supply Public

Italians have voted not to let private companies take over their public water supply. Our fight in the U.S. is much quieter.

The debate around water privatization has been raging for a while, and the global voice to keep water a public good has been heard loud and clear in the last year or so. Just last month, 96 percent of Italian voters elected to keep their water supply in the public domain. The vote was in reaction to Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi passing a law that would allow private companies to buy up their country's public water utilities.

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Why Won't New York City Schools Chancellor Cathie Black Talk to the Press?

On her first day on the job, Cathie Black barely talked to reporters. Now her office won't respond to press requests about her schedule. What gives?

Given that she comes from a media background you would think the Chancellor-designee of New York City's public schools, former Hearst Magazines Chairman Cathie Black, would be comfortable talking to the press. But on her first day on the job, Black barely spoke to reporters, and side-stepped more substantive questions from a crowd of parents. Now Black's office reportedly isn't responding to requests from New York City media about her schedule and public appearances.

According to the New York Daily News, the city's education department press secretary Natalie Ravitz said they wouldn't reveal Black's schedule because:

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