GOOD

Social Snacking: Three Companies Add Impact to Your Empty Calories

Three social enterprises are trying to make munching meaningful.

Anyone who's ever absently scarfed down half a bag of chips or sat too close to the office jelly bean bowl can easily see snacks as the enemy. One-third of the calories in an average American diet come from snacks, according to nutritionist Christopher Mohr.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Will Walmart Shoppers Buy Ethically-Branded Products?

Ethical buying is becoming big business, but few manufacturers have floated charitable business models that target consumers beyond the elites.


When Project 7 started up in 2008, it launched an ethical branding strategy familiar to Whole Foods shoppers everywhere: Simply chewing a piece of Project 7 gum, popping a Project 7 breath mint, or downing a bottle of Project 7 water would help fund nonprofits that "Feed the Hungry," "Save the Earth," and "Heal the Sick." Soon after it released its charity-minded line, Project 7 landed in that king of crunchy retail outlets. This fall, Project 7 made its way to more unexpected shelves: Walmart's.

As of September, customers shopping at 1,490 Walmart Supercenter stores across the country can pick up tubes of Project 7 "Feed the Hungry" mints (each tray purchase funds seven meals in the U.S.) and "Save the Earth" gum (buying one tube will plant a fruit tree). The move from health food grocery store to big-box emporium represents an effort to court lower-income consumers to ethically-branded stuff. "It's been a fascinating thing to watch," says Project 7 founder and CEO Tyler Merrick, 33. "The Walmart shopper is different from the Whole Foods shopper, but they want to feel like they’re giving back, too, even if they don't have as much disposable income to give to charity."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles