GOOD
via Found Animals Foundation / Flickr

Service dogs are true blessings that provide a wide array of services for their owners based on their disability.

They can provide preventative alerts for people with epilepsy and dysautonomia. They can do small household tasks like turning lights on and off or providing stability for their owners while standing or walking.

For those with PTSD they can provide emotional support to help them in triggering situations.

However, there are many people out there who fraudulently claim their pets are service or emotional support animals. These trained animals can cause disturbances in businesses or on public transportation.

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“Eternal Sunshine” Gas Could Erase Memories That Cause PTSD

Researchers think xenon gas could provide a solution for people suffering from emotional trauma.

Screencap from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

Turns out, the only thing that’s sci-fi about Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is its insistence that true love is real (kidding, kidding). Last summer, researchers at McLean Hospital, a psychiatric hospital of Harvard Medical School, published a study in the peer-reviewed scientific journal PLOS ONE about the use of xenon gas for “erasing” emotional memories. In a recent interview with VICE, Dr. Edward G. Meloni, an assistant psychologist at McLean Hospital who authored the study, says that their research could help treat sufferers of Post-Traumautic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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How MDMA Affects Empathy

Scientific evidence is mounting that ecstasy isn’t just a party drug.

According to lore, in the early 1980s, an enterprising drug distributor in Los Angeles was trying to build a street market for the chemical compound MDMA. It seemed like a promising product— MDMA floods the brain with serotonin, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of happiness. Users reported feeling euphoric, appreciating lights and music in a new way, and a rush of emotional intimacy. MDMA was starting to catch on as a club drug, but if it was going to be big, it would need a catchier name.

With partygoers in mind, the dealer coined the name “Ecstasy.” “Empathy,” he reportedly said, “would be more appropriate, but how many people know what it means?”

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War Veterans with PTSD Find Solace in the Streams of Idaho

Veterans and Sun Valley Adaptive Sports are using nature and camaraderie to help those with PTSD cope with the pains that linger after war.

This film and excerpt come from Explore, a multimedia organization that documents leaders around the world who have devoted their lives to extraordinary causes.

A study from 2008 estimates the number of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans who currently have post-traumatic stress disorder (300,000) or who have suffered some form of brain damage (320,000) is greater than the entire population of Denver. In this short film “Fish Out of Water,” we journeyed to Ketchum, Idaho, to explore how some Veterans and Sun Valley Adaptive Sports are using nature and camaraderie to help those with PTSD cope with the pains that linger after war.

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