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How Women in Afghanistan are Challenging Gender Roles with Bikes

What if you were told you could not ride a bike because you're a woman? What if your younger sister wasn’t allowed to ride? What if every single woman in your family was kept away from bicycles simply because riding them was seen as immoral?

What if you were told you could not ride a bike because you're a woman? What if your younger sister wasn’t allowed to ride? What if every single woman in your family was kept away from bicycles simply because riding them was seen as immoral?

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Finding Hope and Community Where We Least Expected

When day after day, year after year, revolves around your child’s chronic disease, it is easy to get down. Luckily, we were both about to find the hope we needed where we least expected it.

Last week my five-year-old asked me why he was sick. He wanted to know why there was no cure and why this had happened to him. I had no answer and could only offer a tearful hug. When day after day, year after year, revolves around your child’s chronic disease, it is easy to get down. Luckily, we were both about to find the hope we needed where we least expected it.

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Why I'm Filming a Documentary About Social Impact Design

Social impact designers are people who are finding concrete, cost-effective solutions to many problems around the world—people who are bringing about real change.

I’m a documentary filmmaker but I started as a sculptor. I’ve long been interested in how we interact with one another, as individuals and societies, through the physical things we select and make. My last film was Objects and Memory, a national, prime time PBS special about the otherwise ordinary things in our homes and museums that mean the most to us because of what they represent. Documentary filmmakers tend to see things that the general public may not notice and illuminate them so that people can better understand their lives and their world. This work takes tenacity and a strong belief that your efforts will have meaning and effect. You have to be an irrational optimist.

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Why Performance Art Is a Tool to Change Human Consciousness

Marina Abramovic is creating an institute for long durational performance.

I have been a performance artist for 40 years of my life. I have done many works that stretch the limitations of the mind and body. One example is Rhythm 0 (1974), where for six hours, I allowed the public to use me as an object. In my most recent work, The Artist Is Present (2010), at MoMA in New York, I sat for 736 hours across from anyone who wanted to sit with me. Over the course of three months, I stared into the eyes of more than 1,500 visitors. It was during this 736-hour performance that I realized the public’s immense desire to slow down and connect to themselves and to one another in a live setting. "Long durational" works like these facilitate this type of connection, but currently there is no space solely dedicated to them.

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This Student Film Hopes to Smash Stereotypes About Mexican Youth

Mexico's more than crime, drugs, and coyotes taking people across the border. A grad student's film hopes to show the side of youth eager to dream.

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Thanks to the media, your view of Mexico is probably full of stereotypes: crime, gangs, drugs, and people handing cash over to coyotes who will take them across the border into the United States in search of a better life. As a graduate film student at Columbia University, I'm taking on those stereotypes and using my thesis film, Victoria, Gto, to tell the story of another Mexico that's often overlooked. It's a side that I feel strongly needs more recognition—that of a country filled with hard working and humble people who have the same hopes and dreams as anyone else.

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This Wristband Monitors Your Automatic Nervous System to Help You Stay in a Good Mood

Wearable tech and wellness apps are both blowing up the spot these days, and this new device combines the two to create something pretty...

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Wearable tech and wellness apps are both blowing up the spot these days, and this new device combines the two to create something pretty unique.
The W/Me wristband, developed by a startup called Phyode, can monitor your body's autonomic nervous system, which acts "as a subconscious control system for your body," the company writes on its Kickstarter page.
Using a medical-grade sensor and the app's algorithm, the band provides real-time stats on your heart rate, breathing and mental health, and sends the information back to your smartphone with recommendations to improve your health, through breathing exercises. It's like a mood ring that comes with a wellness coach.

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