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Group Aims to Bring World’s Fair to L.A. in 2022

A new crowdfunding campaign would kick off the transit-themed project.

Image courtesy of Los Angeles World's Fair

To many of us, World’s Fairs might seem like something mythical, an antiquated convention from a pre-internet age where people actually had to be in the same place to show each other new inventions, cultural products, or designs. Maybe, like me, you heard about the fair in Queens, New York from your parents or grandparents, or read about the legendary Chicago World’s Fair of 1893, detailed in works of fiction like The Devil in the White City or Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth. But now, according to the L.A. Business Journal, a group of “business owners, executives and county officials” have launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to raise money for the first stages of a futuristic, transit-themed World’s Fair in Los Angeles in 2022.

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A Digital Time Capsule Will Archive the Websites 21st Century Students Find Relevant

The Internet Archive and the Library of Congress are creating a collection of websites that represent the modern student experience.

How will future generations know what websites 21st century students accessed and considered critical to their lives and learning experiences? It turns out the archeologist of tomorrow won't be digging up a time capsule from someone's backyard. Thanks to the K12 Web Archiving Program, a three-year-old partnership between the Internet Archive and the Library of Congress, students at 14 schools in 13 states are creating digital time capsules of the sites they believe are representative of the modern student experience. In the process, these student curators are also learning valuable critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving skills.

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Lessons From the Military: What Can Schools Learn From Junior R.O.T.C. Programs?

Ninety-nine percent of students in the Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School in Queens go on to college.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMliN4xhx_o&feature=player_detailpage
Love or hate the military, there is something to be said about the leadership, discipline, and responsibility it teaches. Those same high expectations are evident at the 17-year-old Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School, a 4,000-student overcrowded school that serves a largely immigrant population in Queens, New York. The New York Times recently profiled the program, and in the video above, you can see it and the 741 cadets enrolled in it in action.

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