GOOD

These Emergency Shelters Made From Earthquake Rubble Will Inspire You

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban responds to the post-quake crisis in Nepal with brilliant design.

When large-scale, whole-region-engulfing tragedy hits, humanity is lucky to have an architect like Shigeru Ban. In the past, his disaster relief designs and inventive use of eco-friendly materials, like water-proof and fire-proof paper tubes, have helped countries like his native Japan bounce back from catastrophe. For his newest project, the former winner of the prestigious Pritzker Prize has funneled his formidable talent into the creation of an ambitious plan: a way to turn salvaged brick from earthquakes into temporary relief shelters. When April’s 7.8 magnitude Nepal earthquake shook the traditionally peaceful region, Ban went to work outlining a series of blueprints for modular shelters made of wooden frameworks filled in with brick rubble. Though the announcement was made in May, it’s only this week that we’ve finally been able to peek at what’s to come.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Hurricane Katrina struck just as I had begun my last year in architectural school at Tulane in New Orleans. Charity Hospital had served impoverished New Orleans residents for more than 80 years. It was first built in the 1920s with fully operable windows, but when the hospital underwent mechanical system retrofitting years ago, the windows were sealed shut. A mechanical ventilation system was substituted for fresh air. The system failed during the storm, internal temperatures rose to over 100 degrees, and the building was subsequently evacuated. Taking more than 1,000 lives and forever changing the city, the hurricane profoundly demonstrated how fragile our healthcare buildings are.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Four Designs for Resilient Neighborhoods After Sandy

After Hurricane Sandy tore through the Rockaways in Queens, New York, nonprofits, developers, and the City of New York joined to launch a...

After Hurricane Sandy tore through the Rockaways in Queens, New York, nonprofits, developers, and the City of New York joined to launch a competition for a designing neighborhoods that can better stand up to rising sea levels and future storms. The FAR ROC competition asked for a new design for a part of Far Rockaway that was slated for development several years ago; the original designs were never built because of the financial crisis, so now there's an opportunity to put together a more resilient choice.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles