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Women Now Earning More Bachelor's and Graduate Degrees Than Men

You go, girl! Women are racking up the degrees in record numbers.


You go, girl! According to a new Census report released on Tuesday, Educational Attainment in the United States: 2010, more adults over the age of 25 than ever—30 percent—have bachelor's degrees. And women are out-achieving men when it comes to earning both bachelor's and advanced degrees (as I noted before, some schools even have affirmative action programs for men).

Women began outnumbering men in college enrollment in the early 1980s, and since 1996, they've earned more bachelor's degrees. Data from this latest report shows that for adults aged 25 to 29, 36 percent of women have earned a bachelor's degree or more, compared with only 28 percent of men. But this is the first year women are earning more advanced degrees than their male counterparts. Only a decade ago, men held the majority, 55.4 percent, of advanced degrees. According to the current data, 10,685,000 working women over 25 hold master's degrees, law degrees, doctoral degrees, and other other graduate degrees, compared to only 10,562,000 men. However, there's still room for improvement. Women still lag behind in business, science, and engineering graduate degrees.

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Angry (and Unemployed) College Grads March on Congressional Offices

Out of work student? Join the Briefcase Brigade and tell your member of Congress that you need a job.


Are you a college student or recent graduate looking for work? It's time to join the Briefcase Brigade. Act fast—it's happening today. This new grassroots youth movement (which we first mentioned last week) wants you to suit up like you're heading to a job interview, grab a briefcase, march on your local congressional office with your resume and demand that our lawmakers invest in job creation.

Over five million young people are currently looking for work. For college students searching for summer employment and grads hunting for full-time work—something that will enable them to stop living with mom and dad—it's easy to feel foolish that you believed the message that if you stay in school and work hard, a good job will come your way. You can see the earnestness in the faces of the young people in the video below. They're ready to work, so where are the jobs?

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