GOOD

Shoe Made From Recycled Ocean Trash Pops Up in Time for Summer

Adidas teams up with Parley for the Oceans to create a new line made from colorful sea garbage.

As a rule I’m skeptical of big brands “going green,” but it seems adidas might just be on to something. Recently the sporty retail giant teamed up with Parley for the Oceans—an idealistic group of “creators, thinkers and leaders” attempting to re-purpose the ocean’s overwhelming amount of trash into reusable material—for a mystery project. Monday at the United Nations the brand unveiled their collaboration: the world's first ever shoe upper made solely from harvested ocean plastic and illegal deep-sea gillnets. The nets were retrieved after a 110-day expedition by Parley partner organization Sea Shepherd, where they tracked an illegal poaching vessel off the coast of West Africa.

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Sledgehammer-Wielding Artist Turns Abandoned Buildings Into Beautiful Sculptures

Marjan Teeuwen’s punk-rock architecture transforms decay into epic installations.

In place of an easel and canvas, Dutch artist Marjan Teeuwen uses a jackhammer and saw to create visually stunning still-lifes. For her series Destroyed Houses, the vibrant, flame-haired 62-year-old sculptor/photographer and a team of assistants demolished several units within a post-war, derelict apartment building in Amsterdam, gathering the recycled materials to produce complex walk-in sculptures, meticulously stacked pastiches that resemble Cubist architecture or homages to 17th-century Dutch paintings. For her newest series, Archives, of which there are now seven installations, she peels back the crumbling layers and facades of abandoned buildings to expose their foundations, creating life-size dioramas from the debris. In Johannesburg Archive—in process, and shown below for the first time—the artist travels to South Africa’s “economic engine” to rework a former elementary school in the post-industrial New Doornfontein neighborhood, one of the city's poorest areas. In the process Teeuwen explores the pathos of a metropolis whose barely-concealed, oft-conflicted past provided more than a little inspiration.

Teeuwen's newest work, Johannesburg Archive

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How We're Bringing a Beacon of Creativity to Flint, Michigan

A handful of vagrants sat on the porch steps, drinking. They didn’t seem fazed when I kicked in the door and began bringing all my belongings...

A handful of vagrants sat on the porch steps, drinking. They didn’t seem fazed when I kicked in the door and began bringing all my belongings inside. I had no other place to stay, and couldn’t leave my things out in the open all night. Inside might have not been any safer; I had to be careful not to hit my head on a piece of the second floor which was collapsing in on itself, or cut myself on broken glass and rusty nails. After barricading the door and I finally lay down to sleep on a scrap of carpet that happened to be among my things. I had never so seriously questioned my own sanity as I did that night.

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Steal This Idea: Glove Love Rescues Single Mittens

A week won't go by in the winter that you don't wander past a single glove, dropped into a puddle, hanging over the back of a bench or...

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A week won't go by in the winter that you don't wander past a single glove, dropped into a puddle, hanging over the back of a bench or propped up on a fence post. Sad, cold and lonely, the glove has been lost by its owner and is now all on its own with no one to care for it, destined for the trash bin.
But help is at hand.
Do the Green Thing is a climate change charity in the UK, and a few years back we set up Glove Love, an anti-waste initiative to help lost gloves everywhere find love again and be saved from the landfill.

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Salvaging By Design: Upcycling Fashion Industry Scraps

Clothing and apparel maker Looptworks has a unique business goal: never create anything new.


There are reasons why even in mythology, creation and destruction are linked. It takes something to make something. But in the fashion industry, the element of destruction that goes into your new threads often comes in the form of waste.

Textile manufacturing is notorious for its inefficient use of water and energy. Often the carbon footprint of our clothing only expands as it is shipped to stores from distant lands. Then, after those resources are depleted in an effort to create new material, the average mill discards 60,000 pounds of fabric each week. The color might be wrong. The buyer might have changed her mind, or the manufacturer may have just overproduced. What doesn’t sell is sent to the dump or incinerated. It’s a common practice that results in millions of tons of clothing wasted every year—clothing that was made at a considerable environmental toll to begin with.

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Winners: Revive Your Leftovers

The Revive Your Leftovers project has two winners!

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for July? Waste less.

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