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How TV Screens on Semi-Trucks Could Make the Roads a Safer Place

“Transparent” trucks will allow tailing drivers to see the traffic ahead of them, and avoid preventable automobile accidents.

image via youtube screen capture

There’s nothing that puts a crimp on the thrill of the open roads quite like being stuck behind an eighteen-wheel shipping truck. But beyond simply being a drag on our autobahn-esque fantasies, big rigs can present a very real danger to other motorists. In Argentina, for example, a huge percentage of serious traffic accidents are caused by drivers attempting to pass trucks traveling along single-lane highways. By obscuring the view of drivers behind them, semis can be—by virtue of their very size and presence on the roads—a driving hazard.

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What's So Great About Ikea, Anyway? Why No One in the World Likes Brands

What if 70 percent of brands in the world just disappeared overnight? Most people wouldn’t care.


What if 70 percent of brands in the world disappeared overnight? Most people wouldn’t care, according to a new study of 50,000 people in 14 global markets performed by Havas Media, an international communications firm.

Of all the brands surveyed, only 20 percent made a notably positive impact on people’s lives. That means for all the millions spent on marketing and ads around the world, most people could care less which company sells them their lunch, television, or car. “The overall consumption model and the overall marketing model is not working anymore,” says Sara del Dios, the Havas executive behind the survey.

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The End of the Power Cord: Solar and Typing-Powered Laptops

A new solar laptop could free computers from their power cords. And in the future, the pressure created by typing could be used to charge batteries.

In certain coffee shops in neighborhoods like the East Village, where the self-employed camp out for hours, seats near power outlets command a premium. They are the first to go, and those laptop users not lucky enough to snag one sneak furtive glances at the plugged-in.

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