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People Are Awesome: This 21-Year-Old Rutgers Student Is Running For School Board

This is the first year New Brunswick, NJ has a voice in deciding who controls their schools. Stephanie Rivera is stepping up to make sure it's heard.


"So you're a Rutgers student? A student with no real life experience who wants to be on a school board?"

My name is Stephanie Rivera. I am a 21-year-old junior at Rutgers University and that's the reaction I hear from critics of my candidacy for New Brunswick, New Jersey's Board of Education. For over 20 years, our school board was appointed by the mayor rather than elected by community members. Then this past November New Brunswick community members tirelessly campaigned in support of a referendum to change the school board to an elected one. This is the first year where the community has a voice in deciding who controls their schools.

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Why I'm Taking to the Streets to Demand Education Equity

The 'March as One' elevates the issue of educational inequality in schools.


Los Angeles is my home. It is my family's home, my students' home, and my colleagues' home—and I hope one day it will be home to my own children. As an educator I know students here—like kids in many cities—don’t have equal access to a high quality education, but there is a real lack of civic engagement around the issue. However, this lack of engagement is not just an epidemic here. It's a national epidemic and I’m determined to do something about it.

Along with a group of eight other Los Angeles public school educators, I've organized the March as One—a three-mile long march taking place this Saturday, February 16th to elevate the issue of educational inequality in the city's schools. We've scheduled the March as One three weeks prior to Los Angeles' March 5th school board and mayoral elections—and three days prior to the voter registration deadline—because we're asking candidates to commit to educational equity.

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That Plan to Close Half of Detroit's Schools? It's Really Happening

Paging Eminem: Michigan just approved the insane plan to shut schools and raise class sizes in the Motor City to 60 students.


Eminem's acclaimed Super Bowl advertisement for Chrysler told the world that despite what you've heard, Detroit is making a comeback. Tell that to the city's children, because the State of Michigan has sounded the death knell for Detroit Public Schools. DPS's Emergency Financial Manager (EFM), Robert Bobb, has received approval for his plan to shut down half of the city's public schools over the next two years, raising remaining school class sizes to 60 students. The decision could be the tipping point that pushes Michigan into Wisconsin-style protesting.

Bobb's solution addresses a $327 million budget deficit and will reduce the current 142 schools in the district down to 72 by the 2012-13 school year. The plan will likely drive more families out of the Detroit, setting up a domino effect of even more financial problems for the schools.

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