GOOD

Helpful Animation Explains The Everyday Chemistry All Around Us

Enthalpy and entropy never looked so good

image via youtube screenshot

It’s not that I didn’t care about my high school chemistry classes. It’s just that, after spending the first few weeks of the semester trying to wrap my brain around the molar weight of Schrödinger's cat, I realized that no matter how many times I looked at the periodic table of elements, it was never not going to resemble a chess board from hell. Call me “defeatist” – I prefer to think of myself as having embraced the fact that discretion is often better part of valor. And, in this instance, I decided to discretely transfer into a different class to earn my science credit.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How the American School System Can Train Kids for High-Tech Jobs

Unemployment is high, but there are tons of open jobs in engineering and science. Here's how America's school system can fill the gap.

In May of 2010, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported an estimated 2.6 million jobs were unfilled. In the heart of the worst American recession in decades, with unemployment rates hovering at nine percent, there were over two million unfilled jobs. Why the contradiction? Many of these unfilled positions were in industries such as healthcare, aerospace, advanced precision manufacturing, scientific laboratory occupations, and computer-related design jobs which require knowledge of the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Should Science Education Be About B.S. Detection?

Newsweek columnist suggests eschewing the principles of biology, chemistry, and physics, and instead teaching kids to identify bad science.

Last month, the White House hosted its first science fair. Innovative middle and high school students from around the country trotted their gadgets, doohickeys, and other wares for solving the problems and inconveniences of the world to present before the American president and get a pat on the back from the commander-in-chief.

But, when it comes to science education, these brilliant youngsters are aberrations. Yes, our science and math education curriculum should endeavor to funnel more people toward projects like the ones these kids worked on, but, as Sharon Begley suggests in her regularly insightful Newsweek science column, more generally, the science we teach in schools should be more practical.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Since late last year, the Obama administration has discussed its dedication to so-called STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education. Amidst the budget cuts proposed for next year, it's not clear exactly where the more than $250 million in increased funding for such initiatives will come from—or which programs will receive money. However, until money comes together, there are those that believe science education needs to undergo a dramatic transformation, beginning with its poortrayal as a risky and harrowing endeavor for students.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Keep Reading Show less
Articles