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Making It As a Yoga Teacher: Not As Zen As You Think

Think most yoga instructors are rich, serene deities with legions of followers? Think again.

Four years ago, I decided to become a yoga teacher. I was walking through the housing projects near my shitty Brooklyn apartment after another weekend spent making Bloody Marys for hungover strangers, and it occurred to me: You’ve been practicing yoga for seven years now. It’s the only thing you’ve ever stuck with. Teach it. So I applied for a scholarship for the $3,000-plus tuition and books for a 12-week teacher training program at a studio on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

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At One Austin Restaurant, a Living Wage Doesn't Depend on Tips

Black Star Co-op, a cooperative restaurant and brewery, doesn't believe in tipping.


Upon first glance, Austin's Black Star Co-op in Austin looks like any normal hipster restaurant serving craft beers and creative pub food like portobello burgers and redfish po' boys. But as a former waitress, I immediately noticed what was missing: a tip jar. When I inquired, the bartender told me he didn't take tips. Why? Because he makes a living wage.

Black Star Co-op, the first cooperatively owned microbrewery-restaurant in the country, offers their "worker's assembly" a wage of at least $16 a hour. The co-op provides health insurance and bonuses, too. After a yearlong apprenticeship, every worker also has the duties of a manager—they can hire and fire, get access to the books, and make financial decisions. And they've banned tipping on principle. Service workers elsewhere can make more than $16 an hour on a busy night, but their wages are beholden to the whims of strangers, the shifts they're given, the time they start working, even the weather.

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One in Two College Grads Are Jobless or Underemployed

The class of 2012 is about to get a gigantic wake-up call.


It may not be news to the 1.5 million college graduates struggling to find a job or toiling behind café counters, but Northeastern University researchers break it down: 53.6 percent of bachelor's degree-holders under age of 25 were jobless or underemployed last year, the highest percentage since the dot-com bubble of 2000. In the last year, college graduates were more likely to be employed as servers, bartenders, and food-service helpers than as engineers, physicists, chemists, and mathematicians combined. The class of 2012 is about to get a gigantic wake-up call.

Unsurprisingly, the college majors least likely to yield a job were zoology, anthropology, philosophy, art history, and humanities, intimating that practical degrees like accounting and teaching were the way out of grim post-graduate job prospects. This is certainly true, but it's a short-sighted way of thinking about our problem. We need to stop undervaluing creative fields as a culture and pressure politicians to support education and the arts. Perhaps if the government didn't keep whittling down allocations to state universities, these humanities grads wouldn't be so paralyzed by debt and could pursue their creative impulses—or score a tenure-track position with a Ph.D.

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Where a Waitress Stands Changes Her Tips

Do you like it when a waitress gets up close and personal? Well now there's a scientific study calculating the value of close serving.

It's an adage in psychology that proximity breeds liking, the closer people are in physical space, the more likely they are to become emotionally close, but that's because they see each other more frequently, increasing familiarity. You're just more likely to befriend your neighbors than random families across town. But does physical proximity affect how much change we fork over during lunch?

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