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Is the Social Enterprise Bubble About to Burst?

Social entrepreneurs talk about profit vs. impact, being treated as ‘godly human beings,’ and whether or not their bubble is about to burst.

Over the past two months, GOOD has profiled organizations in Africa using market solutions to solve water and sanitation challenges, improve agriculture, and promote public health. Social enterprises like these are transforming development work, and social entrepreneurs are being hailed as rock stars.

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So You Think You Can Be a Social Entrepreneur? Reality TV Meets the Impact Economy

A social enterprise version of The Apprentice could promote good work, but will it be too superficial?

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In Liberia, Factory Work is Changing Womens' Lives—Starting at Home

Within the first six months of opening a factory, six out of the initial 25 female workers divorced their husbands.

This story has been updated.

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Chutes, Ladders, and Safety Nets: How Microinsurance Helps African Development

A social business attaches insurance policies to products for poor people, creating a safety net for millions.


James Abuh-Prah had owned a used electronics shop in a small market in Accra for 17 years before a flood took everything.

It was late one night in October, and the torrential rains hadn’t stopped for hours. “By 5 a.m. the water was up to my chest,” he says. He had taken out a $2,400 loan from his bank, Opportunity International, to use as capital to buy used televisions, stereos, and other electronics. Now, everything was destroyed.

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Waste Not: In Ghana, Fecal Sludge Could Be Black Gold

A startup company wants to turn human waste into a commodity (and change the world).


This is the first story in our new series on social enterprise in Africa by Laura Burke, a reporter based in Cote d'Ivoire.

Accra, Ghana, is a tropical capital on the Gulf of Guinea, but almost no one swims in the ocean here. If you are not turned off by the mounds of trash the ocean continuously heaves onto the beach, the water’s unnatural brownish color hints something is awry. The city’s open sewers empty straight into the ocean. And then, of course, there is Lavender Hill.

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