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ICYMI: Watch a Replay of Last Night’s Aurora Borealis

A rare storm hit Earth on St. Patrick’s Day and amplified a stunning light show

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

A rare G4, otherwise known as a "severe" geomagnetic storm, hit Earth on St. Patrick’s Day, beginning around 10 a.m. ET, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center.

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Mesmerize Yourself With This Time-lapse Video of the Chicago River Going Green for St. Patrick’s Day

Dying the Chicago River for St. Patrick’s Day started as an accidental discovery, but today is a beloved city tradition

image via youtube screen capture

There’s something hypnotically soothing about seeing the Chicago River slowly turn a vivid shade of Kelly green to celebrate St. Patrick’s day; it’s like watching a gigantic lava lamp undulate through the heart of downtown Chicago.

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Harlem School Teaches Kids Real Irish Jig (and Cultural Understanding)

Closing the achievement gap isn't just about test scores. Harlem Academy is teaching kids how to appreciate a diverse world.

Thanks to Siobhan Ni Mhaolagain, a Fulbright scholar from Dublin, Ireland, elementary school students attending Harlem Academy in New York City now know how to dance an Irish jig. In the video above, you can watch Ni Mhaolagain teaching "Some Say the Devil is Dead," an "old Irish jig that has been danced for generations in Irish homes and local parish halls."

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New Technology Creates a More Eco-Friendly Head on Your Guinness

Just in time for St. Patrick's Day, Irish mathematicians discover a biodegradable alternative to the plastic widget in cans of Guinness.


As St. Patrick's Day draws near, many of you may be anticipating a nice chilled glass of Guinness, complete with a creamy foam head. But if you're not propping up a bar in Ireland, and are instead pouring your beer out of a can at home, that long-lasting head can only be produced with the help of a plastic widget.

Simply pouring a carbonated beer, such as a lager, from the can into a glass is enough to generate a head. But this is not the case for stouts, which are infused with nitrogen bubbles, rather than carbon dioxide, in order to create their uniquely smooth texture. The small plastic widgets in each can of stout contain pressurized nitrogen, which is released once the can is opened, triggering some of the dissolved nitrogen in the beer to bubble up into a head.

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