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The Week In Design: 10 Stories You Can’t Miss

This week we were promised floating parks, flying bikes, and earbuds that will give us superhuman hearing.

In a fun, fashionable move forward, Google’s Advanced Technology And Projects (ATAP) lab has teamed up with Levi's to develop a smart fabric that is able to conduct “electrical variations in the skin,” bend, and morph according to the wearer. This means that your denim, in the near future, could potentially act like a touch screen, and even sync up with your social media devices. Called Project Jacquard, the collaboration recruited creatives in fashion, textile production, coding, and development to produce the conductive yarns that make up the smart fabric. According to Prote.in, “gesture-sensitive areas can be woven at precise locations, anywhere on the textile. Alternatively, sensor grids can be woven throughout the textile, creating large, interactive surfaces that could be used to make larger products, like smart furniture and art installations.”

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In Costa Rica, TV Dishes Broadcast Colorful Female Empowerment

Latin media company Claro hires local artists to transform satellite dishes into vibrant ads for women-run small business.

Just one of the many DIY billboards springing up across rural Costa Rica as part of the “Signs of Progress” project.

In rural Costa Rica, many citizens, especially bored housewives, would rather give up bread than their beloved TV sets. In this tiny nation of just 4.8 million, over 92% of households own boxes, which means a surplus of unsightly cable dishes.

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Simon Denny Turned the World’s Most Overused Tech Term into Art

How one artist is using startup culture to pull back the thin veil separating creativity and commerce.

Simon Denny. Installation view of New Management at Portikus, Frankfurt, 2014. Photo Helena Schlichting

To New Zealand artist Simon Denny, success doesn’t equal happiness. The 33-year-old, Berlin-based creative has achieved quite a bit of success—he just mounted a solo exhibition at Museum of Modern Art’s PS1, he is represented by one of New York’s most prestigious galleries, and, next month, he is New Zealand’s entrant in the Venice Biennale. “Success is a complicated thing,” he said over Skype from his studio in Berlin. “For me, it’s just work. It’s rewarding to get projects done that are worth doing. The myth of success is something else than achieving things I want to achieve.”

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