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Four Smart Ways to Attract College Students to Teaching

Revolutionizing teacher talent It helps to correct misperceptions and convey the true value proposition being an educator has to offer.


In the United States only 24 percent of all new teachers come from the top third of the class, whereas in countries with the best school systems (Finland, Korea, Singapore), 100 percent of new teachers come from the top third. According to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, (PDF) the U.S. needs more great teachers, and especially more great math and science teachers, if we are going to remain economically competitive,

There are four important things we as a country and education sector are not doing enough of—that we could and should be doing—to attract more talented college students into the teaching profession.

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What's the Key to Ending the Math and Science Teacher Shortage?

The real problem isn't recruiting teachers. It's keeping them in the classroom.

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Obama's Education Budget Is on the Right Track. Too Bad Congress Won't Approve It

Obama's new budget proposes spending where it matters most: PELL grants, teacher training, and science and math education. If only it could pass.


President Obama unveiled his entire fiscal year 2012 budget yesterday at Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology in Baltimore, Maryland, and his proposed $77.4 billion in education spending—a 4 percent increase from 2010, the most recent budget enacted—bucks the national trend of defunding education. It's not a perfect budget, but Obama's committing to spending where it matters most: PELL grants, teacher and principal recruitment and training, and science, technology, engineering and math education.

In a post-budget-reveal conference call with reporters, Education Secretary Arne Duncan acknowledged that announcing the budget in a technology school was deliberate and reflects the laser-like focus the Obama Administration has on STEM education. Duncan said a big part of increasing the number of STEM educators nationwide will depend on funding the development of alternative certification programs that will make it easier for qualified professionals to head into the classroom. He also hopes to incentivize excellence in teaching by awarding grants to high performing STEM teachers.

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