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This Woman Can See Because Her Husband 3D-Printed Her Tumor

To help doctors remove his wife’s tumor, Michael Belzer printed them 3D model to practice on.

Pamela Shavaun Scott and her skull [via Make]

In William Gibson’s 2014 novel The Peripheral, the acclaimed author envisioned a not-too-distant future in which 3D printing is as ubiquitous for his characters as shopping at a convenience store is for us – where items as complicated and diverse as smartphones and designer drugs can be printed (“fabbed,” for “fabricated”) with ease. But that is science fiction, and we still live in a world of science fact, where, for most of us, 3D printing is not part of our everyday lives (...yet). Still, the technology has grown from an upscale – if fairly limited – hobby, to a serious tool for designers, engineers, and, in the case of one printing enthusiast, the means by which he helped save his wife’s eyesight.

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Transform the Conversation About Identity on This Interactive Online Platform

“Many of the transformative moments in history have been generated by things that could formally be described as art,” Chris Johnson, Question...

“Many of the transformative moments in history have been generated by things that could formally be described as art,” Chris Johnson, Question Bridge founder.

As an artist, my work seen in the commercial fine art market frequently deals with issues of popular culture and race, topics I've explored through photography, mixed media, video, and painting. I'm committed to balancing my practice with collaborative social and often public art projects. For several years, I've collaborated with a talented team, including actor/producer Jesse Williams, and artists Bayeté Ross Smith, Kamal Sinclair, and Chris Johnson. Our transmedia project, Question Bridge, seeks to create a dialogue about identity and shatter stereotypes in the process.

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'Girl Rising': Ending Gender Disparities in Education and Tech Access Is Key to Global Prosperity

67 million girls under the age of 15 are not in school each day. Eliminating the obstacles to that can have a multiplier effect on social change.


Every morning, students around the world wake up and go to school. However, millions of children face tremendous barriers each day that prevent them from getting what many in the U.S. take for granted—an education. The majority of these children are disadvantaged girls who are challenging the social norms of their families, their communities, and their nations that have deterred them from receiving an education.

67 million girls under the age of 15 are not in school each day. Research shows that when more girls attend school and stay, there is a highly positive impact on their families, communities and economies. Yet, around the world, millions of girls face barriers to education, such as early and forced marriage, domestic slavery, sex trafficking, gender violence and discrimination, lack of access to healthcare, and school fees. Eliminating these obstacles can have a multiplier effect on social change—increasing girls' future wages, reducing infant mortality, creating more transparent businesses, increasing a country's GDP, and leading to faster economic growth.

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