GOOD
via Pat Jarrett / Flickr

The Civil War ended over 150 years ago. The Confederacy lost fighting in support of slavery, one of the most heinous crimes ever perpetrated by humanity.

The south rose, it lost, and America is unquestionably a better place because of it.

Vestiges of the war still remain in the south in the form of monuments, holidays, and state buildings named after notable Confederates. But over the past few years, lawmakers are beginning to take strides to remove the Confederacy from public view.

Keep Reading
Politics

Why Are People Still Having Weddings at Plantations Slaves Built?

Your wedding day is supposed to be the happiest day in your life. So what if your happiness depends on the historical persecution of black people?


Your wedding day is supposed to be the happiest day of your life. So what if your happiness depends on exploiting the historical persecution of black people? Last year, a white British couple staged an elaborate "colonial Africa"-themed destination ceremony in South Africa, complete with black servants in fez hats and glorious laughter. The couple's been condemned for holding the affair. But stateside, hundreds of marriages are cinched every year on the soil of America's own historical horrors. Welcome to the plantation wedding.

Just yesterday, a PR flack shot me an e-mail detailing the "eight alternative wedding trends" that are hot this summer. Among them: "The Rustic South." "Many couples are going for the nostalgic feel of the old South," she told me, reflecting a "growing hunger in popular culture for all things Southern"—and for authentic backdrops built by the fruits of slave labor. "I've definitely been seeing more plantation weddings," she said when prompted.

Keep Reading
Articles