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Why Should Women Read The Economist?

The Economist's new ad campaign attempts to appeal to women—by asserting that appealing to women is unnecessary.


This week, an advertisement for The Economist hit the mailboxes of a select demographic of potential subscribers. “Why should women read The Economist?” the circular asked, before answering, “They shouldn’t.”

Folded inside the pamphlet was the punchline: "Accomplished, influential people should read us. People like you."

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Feelin' All White: The Economist Stages Yet Another All-White-Dude Panel

With its new white-dude "Ideas Arena," The Economist is just the latest publication to ignore the realities of our diverse world.

In late May, prompted by a panel on the future of media that was composed solely of white men, I suggested that perhaps powerful white men should take it upon themselves to not participate in those kinds of "so homogeneous as to be useless" exercises. The New York Times' David Carr agreed. So did Wired's Spencer Ackerman. Apparently, venerated global politics publication The Economist did not.

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Video: Women's Economic Opportunities Around the World

Today is the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day. You should watch this informative motion graphic from The Economist and JESS3.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5wRMaEmf6c

For the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day, you should check out this informative motion graphic from The Economist and JESS3.

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Food Price Watch: Riots in Algeria; Mexican Government Buys Maize Futures

Sugar, meat, and cereal prices reach record levels as economists warn of global food riots by Easter.


On Wednesday, we told you that world food price levels had entered "danger territory," according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. The cost of a basket of sugar, grain, and oilseed reached a new high in December, surpassing previous records set in 2008.

In the announcement, two days ago, FAO economist Abdolreza Abbassian was careful to downplay fears that high prices could once again spark food riots, as they did in 2008. However, yesterday brought news of rioters in Algeria chanting "Bring us sugar" while setting fire to tires and smashing street lamps. Simultaneously, the Mexican government invested heavily in maize futures in order to stabilize prices through the third quarter of 2011, in response to the threat of industrial action by the powerful National Union of Millers and Tortilla Makers.

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