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Why Should Women Read The Economist?

The Economist's new ad campaign attempts to appeal to women—by asserting that appealing to women is unnecessary.


This week, an advertisement for The Economist hit the mailboxes of a select demographic of potential subscribers. “Why should women read The Economist?” the circular asked, before answering, “They shouldn’t.”

Folded inside the pamphlet was the punchline: "Accomplished, influential people should read us. People like you."

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Revolution in Egypt: Who's Next?

Hosni Mubarak's regime is over. Which other populations around the Middle East and Africa are ready to follow Egypt's lead?

You may have heard: The 30-year dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt is over. He was toppled by a swell of popular protest, organized with the aid of technology. What kind of government Egypt will end up with is unclear (the military is in charge in the near term) but these are historic times for the country and the region.

To provide some insight into which countries might follow Egypt's lead and change leadership, The Economist made this "Shoe Thrower's Index" (throwing a shoe, as you may remember, is a strong sign of dissatisfaction in Arab and Islamic countries).

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If Height Matched Income, American Rich Would Be Two Miles Tall

If height and income were proportional, the average American would be waist high. The rich would be two miles tall. The poor? Nearly invisible.


Dovetailing off Cord's recent thoughts on American inequality (and inequity), The Economist presents a powerful way of imagining the gap between rich and poor in the United States:

Jan Pen, a Dutch economist who died last year, came up with a striking way to picture inequality. Imagine people’s height being proportional to their income, so that someone with an average income is of average height. Now imagine that the entire adult population of America is walking past you in a single hour, in ascending order of income.

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