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The Fact That Changed Everything: Rose Tourje and Anew Foundation

ANEW’s model is a win-win for all parties: Furniture donors are eligible for tax deductions, while beneficiaries receive good furniture.


This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and here to read about other Figures of Progress.

One day in May 2005, it rained furniture in downtown Los Angeles. From a fifth-story office window on Main Street, desks, drawers, bookcases, and every variety of office equipment were dumped unceremoniously down to the pavement below. Behind a chain link fence, Rose Tourje, then a senior associate at architecture firm Daniel Mann Johnson and Mendenhall, watched and was appalled at the waste. “It went on for a few days. All sorts of furniture you could imagine just came tumbling out the window.”

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The Fact That Changed Everything: Father Boyle and Homeboy Industries

To combat gang violence, one man wondered: What if we invest in people rather than just trying to incarcerate our way out of the problem?


This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM

An inviting pop of orange on the corner of Bruno Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown invites patrons into Homegirl Café. During breakfast hours, plates of chilaquiles are being served up alongside fresh baked goods. In short order, however, it’s apparent this is no typical café. Indeed, a daily gathering is taking place in a lobby adjoining the café. This is the headquarters of Homeboy Industries, an organization that serves high-risk, recently incarcerated and former gang-involved youth through counseling, education, tattoo removal, legal services, job training and job placement. As usual, the morning meeting is standing room only.

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The Fact That Changed Everything: Jim Moriarty and Surfrider Foundation

"If you go to any beach on the globe, there are plastics on it," says the CEO of Surfrider Foundation. He's on a mission to clean our coasts.


This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and here to read about other Figures of Progress.

When Jim Moriarty began surfing around 1995, he noticed a big difference between riding waves and skateboarding. “When you skateboard, you choose the piece of concrete you want to be on, but when you surf, you don’t choose the condition or the health of the water—you’re immersed in it,” Moriarty says.

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