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U.S. Obesity Epidemic Now Requiring Fatter Crash Test Dummies

The super-sizing of all forms of American transit continues apace, in response to the country's obesity epidemic.


The super-sizing of all forms of American transit continues apace: First ambulances, then buses, and now crash test dummies are having to be enlarged in response to the country's obesity epidemic.

Current child safety seats for kids between one and four years old are tested up to a maximum of 40 pounds, while belt-positioned booster seats, which protect kids weighing more than 40 pounds, are only safe for taller children aged four and above. The problem is that overweight and obese toddlers are reaching 40 pounds by the age of two and a half, which means that they are too heavy for the forward-facing safety seats and too young and short for the shoulder-best booster seat.

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Video: A Brief History of the School Bus

Why are school buses yellow? How many miles to the gallon does the average school bus get? How many miles does the average school bus travel?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16UUWai0JHk
Why are school buses yellow? How many miles to the gallon does the average school bus get? And how many miles does the average school bus travel?
In 1992, John Merrow, education correspondent for PBS' NewsHour, immersed himself with school bus riders and drivers. Around that time, Houston's school buses got a whopping seven miles to the gallon and traveled over 15 million miles each year \n—and today, it's not much better.

Are you familiar with other cities doing similarly innovative things involving student transport?

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