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Fight Back Against Poor Parkers With This Photo-Shaming App

TowIt lets you call out crappy parking jobs and the terrible drivers behind them.

Image via TowIt

Poor parkers afflict every city, both small and major. Whether it’s a minivan crashing through a Starbucks window, or something more benign like plopping down a foot away from the curb, the onslaught of terrible drivers can seem overwhelming. In fact, it can even make you feel downright powerless. Now, however, you can publicly shame these crappy drivers on social media with TowIt, which allows you to snap a photo of perps and upload for maximum shaming capabilities. The app, available via Google and Apple, “allows civilians to report selfish or illegal parking and dangerous driving in real time.” According to its creators, “TowIt works with municipal governments, local law enforcement, and towing companies to remove the barriers required to make cities effectively fight and deter bad parking and dangerous driving habits.”

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Waffle House Teams Up With “Uber for Packages”

How can FedEx compete against bacon and pancakes?

Photo by rpavich via Flickr

Yesterday, the Wall Street Journal reported on a new partnership between Waffle House and delivery startup Roadie, in which the ubiquitous grit-slinging chain will offer up their roster of more than 1,700 locations as pickup and drop-off points for packages. Inspired by the success of sharing-economy heavies Uber and Airb, the Roadie app will compete with parcel services like FedEx and UPS, connecting people who need things delivered with citizen drivers willing to deliver them for a small fee. According to WSJ:

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Where Do People Walk and Bike the Most? It's Not Where You Think

Alaska tops a new ranking of biking and walking levels in all 50 states. Among cities, Boston takes the number one spot.


The Alliance for Biking and Walking just released its biannual benchmark report, and the results may surprise you. The state with the greatest percentage of cyclists and walkers? Alaska. Among cities, Boston takes the crown.

If those results seem a little bit off—Isn’t Portland the country’s biking mecca? Or, if you trust Bicycling Magazine, Minneapolis?—consider another figure from the Alliance’s report: Americans choose to walk for 10.5 percent of all their trips, and bike just 1 percent of the time. While Bostonians aren’t known for their rad bike culture, 13.9 percent of the city’s commuters walk to work. (And I hear there are plenty of fixies to be found in Allston.)

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