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This Designer’s Typeface Lets Anyone Experience Life with Dyslexia

Rather than show us what a reading disorder looks like, designer Daniel Britton wants us to understand how it feels.

via danielbritton.info

When it comes to conveying the difficulties faced by those living with a reading disability, graphic designer Daniel Britton has opted to show, rather than tell.

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Typographic Road Trip: 50 States, 50 Posters

In the summer of 1994, my family planned a road trip from Houston to Washington, D.C. My parents highlighted the route on a map and I remember...

In the summer of 1994, my family planned a road trip from Houston to Washington, D.C. My parents highlighted the route on a map and I remember my mom asking me if I wanted to take the scenic route. My answer was yes.

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The History of How the Letters on This Page Came to Look This Way

An animated short takes us through the history of typography.

Think about how much we learn about the world from letters on a page. Letters that make sentences that tell stories—and capture our histories. Or letters and numbers that form equations and recipes and how-to instructions. Even the letters on the page have their own stories, which is the subject of Ben Barrett-Forrest's animated short on the history of typography. In a short and sweet clip, he shows us how letter fonts have changed visually through time and addresses the history of italics, the influence of advertising and computers, and the popularity of Helvetica.

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Project: Redesign the Recipe

We think the standard text recipe can be improved. Help us inspire a new generation to cook with clear, simple, easy-to-understand graphic recipes.

[Update March 10, 2011: See the submission here.]

If you believe everything that Michael Pollan tells us, people are doing less and less cooking. They're flopping down on the couch and watching other people cook on the Food Network.

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Print. It Ain't Dead Yet

Print is dead. Or is it just sleeping?


Print is dead. Or is it just sleeping?

A decade ago, designer Jessica Helfand, wrote a passionate defense of the written word (and of typography in particular) to her then two year old daughter, Fiona. Well, it actually was an essay commemorating the second edition of David Carson's The End of Print, (which was published way back in 1995, ages before Kindles, iPads, and Smartphones and had precious little to say about technology's rapid encroachment).

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