GOOD

A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Duke and UNC Adopt Caps and Gowns Made Out of Recycled Plastic Bottles

Good news: A new fabric called GreenWeaver, spun from molten plastic pellets, is being used for the graduation gear by a growing list of schools.


Need another good reason to recycle your plastic bottles? They might end up as part of someone's graduation cap and gown outfit. The Virginia-based company Oak Hall Cap & Gown has long produced graduation gear, but in 2008, after realizing that schools are trying to become more environmentally responsible, it began developing a fabric called GreenWeaver that's spun from molten plastic pellets. Each gown uses an average of 23 post-consumer plastic bottles—even the bags the gowns come in are made out of recycled plastic.

According to GreenWeaver's Facebook page, five percent of colleges currently purchase the environmentally conscious caps and gowns. That translates into "310,000 graduates who have worn GreenWeaver resulting in 7,130,000 plastic bottles being removed from landfills."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles