GOOD

Black Students Are Three Times More Likely to Be Suspended Than Their White Classmates

New data from the Office of Civil Rights provides hard evidence of prejudice against black and Latino students in America's education system.


As my third-grade son walked down a school hallway last week, a teacher stopped him and accused him of stealing something. He told her he didn't know anything about the incident, but she pressured him to confess. She even asked her students—who were also in the hallway and heard the whole exchange—if they thought he was the thief.

It's tempting to write off the incident as one educator's lapse of judgment, but, in fact, my son's experience is a symptom of a larger pattern of discrimination in our nation's schools. Data released this week by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights provides hard evidence of prejudice against black and Latino students in America's education system.

Keep Reading
Articles

A New Video Competition Invites You to Tell the World Why Open Education Matters

The 'Why Open Education Matters' video competition hopes to raise awareness of the way OER is transforming teaching and learning.


A decade after MIT's OpenCourseWare project kicked off the Open Educational Resources movement, it's transformed people's ability to share knowledge across the globe. Last fall, Stanford professors Peter Norvig and Sebastian Thrun offered their most popular class to the world for free, and Thrun went on to launch an entire open education platform. MIT launched MITx, which allows anyone to take MIT classes online and earn certificates of completion, and several universities are developing OER libraries stocked with free or low-cost digital course materials.

But despite these revolutionary examples—and the real impact they're making on people's lives—most people still don't know what the OER movement is. To help push awareness of OER into the mainstream, Creative Commons, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Open Society Foundations are taking advantage of the first-ever Open Education Week by launching "Why Open Education Matters," a video competition that will award cash prizes of up to $25,000 to the "best short videos that explain the use and promise of free, high-quality open educational resources and describe the benefits and opportunities these materials create for teachers, students and schools."

Keep Reading
Articles

Student Video Contest Seeks to Spread the Word About the Real Cost of College

The College Net Price Calculator Student Video Contest will award three prizes of $1,500 each.

Can a video contest pave the way to making sure families have straightforward information about the cost of college? That's the hope of the U.S. Department of Education. This year, the department launched a set of handy tools—including a net price calculator—on its useful College Affordability and Transparency Center. Beginning at the end of October, new government regulations required all colleges to post a net price calculator on their websites. But according to the USDOE, too few students know what a net price even is, and still have no idea that they should even be looking for the calculators.

Keep Reading
Articles