GOOD

A Love Letter to DC

A Love Letter to Washington, DC by Brightest Young Things' Founder, Svetlana Legetic

When approached to write this letter, I was asked to be emotional and real and true to my feelings about Washington DC, and about how it has shaped me as an individual (and entrepreneur). If you know me, you know that I am neither outwardly emotional nor nostalgic, and so this was, well, a little bit of a challenge. But because it turns out that I do truly, legitimately love this place, here goes...

Keep Reading
Articles

Have 5 Minutes? Use it to Influence Federal Diversity Policy

Stakeholders like us have until December 24, 2013 to provide feedback and recommendations on how to make diversity regulations more effective.

Attention diversity nerds, Christmas came early this year! After three years of anticipation, six of the Offices of Minority and Women Inclusion finally released some proposed standards addressing how they're going to assess diversity policies of the banks and other financial businesses their agencies oversee in the private sector. This is a big deal, and we have an opportunity to make a big impact.

Keep Reading
Articles

Why I Won't Be Watching the 'Frontline' Profile of Michelle Rhee

Michelle Rhee should offend anyone interested in true education reform


A bunch of my friends have posted the trailer for Frontline's documentary on Michelle Rhee, "The Education of Michelle Rhee," airing starting tonight on PBS, (check your local listings). Honestly, I'm not watching it. Most people get a benefit of a doubt, but Rhee's earned nothing but doubt from me.

Her videotaped firing of a principal when she was the chancellor of the Washington, D.C. public schools from 2007 to 2010 was only the first of many things I found out about her that would and should offend anyone interested in true education reform, not the corporatist thinking we currently have at work.

Keep Reading
Articles

In Washington, DC, Doctor's Add Vegetable Prescriptions to Anti-Obesity Arsenal

Washington, DC's taking a page from other cities' book with a new prescription program for fruits and vegetables.

There are plenty of cities trying to tackle obesity with punitive measures, by banning sodas or ditching vending machines. A new program in Washington, DC is taking an opposite approach, encouraging healthy eating not by preventing people from eating poorly but by subsidizing healthy foods.

Keep Reading
Articles