GOOD

via Genius

For many years brands like Lonsdale, Fred Perry, and New Balance were the favored brands of right-wing fascists in Europe. The N on sneakers could easily be repurposed to reference Nazism, and the unofficial uniform of a shaved head, bomber jacket, and military boots acted as visual signifiers of group affiliation. But due to brand backlash, and in some cases, the outright banning of certain garments, far right-wingers have been forced to get a little more creative in their sartorial choices. One brand that saw room in the market for a new, Nazi-friendly line was Thor Steinar, a multimillion dollar label run from a small town on the fringes of Berlin, that uses the Nordic imagery and gothic lettering that has become a trademark of the subculture. Though on the surface they may look like Abercrombie & Fitch or Diesel, the company has subtly woven into its designs Nazi references such as a Messerschmitt aircraft and Germanic runes (among others).

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Mary Kazembe and her family would have never expected the heartbreak and turmoil that xenophobia—an intense, irrational hatred or fear of people from other countries—would have caused them after moving to a neighborhood of Johannesburg in search of a better life. They left their home in Zambia because of a lack of food.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles