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Watch The Most “Loving” Movie Of The Year

And help the ACLU while you’re at it

Acts of civil disobedience and fiery speeches helped ignite the civil rights movement of the ’60s. But a much quieter battle for equality began in 1958, when interracial couple Richard Loving and Mildred Delores Jeter married in Washington, D.C., to avoid Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act of 1924, which outlawed marriages between whites and nonwhites. The couple’s love and defiance ultimately took them to the Supreme Court, where the justices ruled the Virginia anti-miscegenation law unconstitutional.

This battle is detailed in Focus Feature’s recent Golden Globe and Oscar-nominated film Loving. Directed by Jeff Nichols (Mud, Midnight Special), and starring Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga, Loving is steeped in rural quietude, with the Lovings simply trying to exist and often watching the American Civil Liberties Union fight from afar. The filmmakers will be auctioning off various experiences, film props, and concert tickets throughout the month of February to help raise money that will be donated to the ACLU of Southern California. The We Stand for Love fundraiser coincides with both Valentine’s Day and Black History Month.

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These “Headphones” Convert Sound Into Vibration So The Deaf Can Experience Music

“Music is one of the deepest and most primal forms of human communication”

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When it comes to sound—particularly recorded and live music—we take vibration for granted. But attend a flamenco performance or go to a My Bloody Valentine concert (as I like to), and you’ll understand what it’s like to feel those vibrations in your bones.

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Look Behind You: The View Across The Street From The World’s Most Famous Monuments

A conversation with the photographer who likes to point his camera the wrong way

Mao Mausoleum, Tiananmen Square, Beijing, China

If you’ve ever visited a monument or checked out a famous artwork in a museum, you probably lined up with a bunch of tourists and snapped a photo of it. For his ongoing project Volte-face, photographer Oliver Curtis does almost the same thing—but he’s facing what most people would consider to be the wrong way.

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Attorneys General Coalition Takes on Big Oil Over Climate Change

Frustrated by federal gridlock, state-level officials are coming together to investigate companies like ExxonMobil.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman in 2012. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

When New York State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman issued a subpoena to ExxonMobil in November, it followed a yearlong investigation into what the energy company knew about climate change and what it failed to share with the public over several decades. This week, Schneiderman announced a coalition of attorneys general who are committed to “aggressively protecting and building upon the recent progress the United States has made in combating climate change.”

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This Game of Thrones-Loving Lawyer Explains Why He’s Seeking a Trial by Combat

Turning to history, a frustrated Staten Island attorney gets creative.

Image by Helayne Seidman. Courtesy of Richard Luthmann.

Late last summer in New York, modern law got a medieval request for judicial relief. Staten Island-based attorney Richard Luthmann, a very serious Game of Thrones fan, petitioned the state Supreme Court in August for a trial by combat. Luthmann wanted to take up sword and shield against Connecticut investors who alleged he had helped a client duck a $500,000 debt the investors felt they were owed.

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‘Sand Painting’ Artist Tony Plant on Finding His Place in a Landscape

“There’s no protocol, no hierarchy, and I don’t have to ask permission.”

U.K.-based artist Tony Plant is known for his intricate, geometric “sand paintings.” The work, captured in epic images as well as time-lapse videos, has found many admirers on social media. But before becoming an internet sensation, Plant made his sand paintings with the hope that just a few individuals might randomly encounter them and form lasting memories around the work.

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