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Teaching the Middle Class to Invest Like the One Percent

A new financial services company wants to create a “revolution” by giving everyday Americans access to the investment strategies of the wealthy

Illustration by Addison Eaton

Income inequality is by now a term most Americans know well. From French economist Thomas Piketty’s surprise bestseller tackling the topic, to the new leader of the Fed, Janet Yellen, confessing that the trend “greatly concerns” her, to a much-shared study indicating the U.S. is closer to an oligarchy than democracy, 2014 was the year that the widening gap between the wealthiest and poorest families in America went mainstream.

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A Guide to Living Like the 1% (On a 99% Budget)

Yachting, brow lifts, and nights at the opera: We are the 99%.

Follow this handy guide and we guarantee you’ll realize there is virtually no difference between an über-wealthy lifestyle and your wretched, student- loan-bedraggled existence! Leave your unpaid bills and untreated medical conditions far, far behind. All the adventures and accoutrements of the 1 percent are at your grubby, calloused fingertips.

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Photos: 99 Portraits for the 99 Percent

The OWS encampment may be gone, but the protest’s legacy lives on across New York City. Click through to see 99 Photos for the 99 Percent.

The Occupy Wall Street encampment may be gone, but the protest’s legacy lives on across New York City through Steven Greaves’ 99 Portraits for the 99 Percent. Click through to see all 99 portraits.

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OWS 1, Wall Street 0: 99 Percent Strikes Fear in the Hearts of Big Banks

Supporters of big banks may be publicly writing off OWS, but privately, they're starting to shake in their boots.


A Washington lobbying firm with plenty of buddies in the finance industry sent a proposal this week to one of their clients, the American Bankers Association. The pitch? For a bargain price of $850,000, Clark Lytle Geduldig & Cranford would conduct “opposition research” on Occupy Wall Street in order to construct “negative narratives” about the protests and sympathetic politicians. CLGC's memo [PDF], obtained by MSNBC, warns that a Democratic alliance with the movement "has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.” It goes on to say that the "bigger concern should be that Republicans will no longer defend Wall Street companies.”

The memo takes for granted that Democrats will successfully harness the power of OWS to their benefit, citing Democratic strategists who have identified the movement "as a way to tap this populist anger." It remains to be seen whether Occupy Wall Street will align themselves with or donate to elected officials or candidates; unlike the Tea Party, OWS activists seem intent on calling out the corruption of politics rather than propping up a particular party. Regardless, it's probably a safe bet that OWS supporters won't be voting Republican—a big problem for Wall Street.

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Thanksgiving Booze for the 99 Percent

To swallow ongoing economic injustice, you might need to go a little harder.

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Why Being Evicted Was the Best Thing to Happen to OWS in Weeks

A judge just ruled that protesters can no longer camp in Zuccotti. But today wasn't a total loss.

A little after midnight this morning, New York City police officers stormed Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan and forced away hundreds of Occupy Wall Street protesters. The police were operating under orders of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who released a statement saying that protesters would be allowed to return to Zuccotti after it was cleaned, but no longer will anyone be allowed to sleep on the premises or erect tents: “There is no ambiguity in the law here—the First Amendment protects speech—it does not protect the use of tents and sleeping bags to take over a public space.”

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